Life

11 Lessons From Cheese

mouse-mazeYears ago, I read a simple, yet powerful little book: Who Moved My Cheese?, a parable of four mice adventurers in a maze struggling to find enough cheese to survive. (Cheese in this story stands for anything you need in your life: career, money, love, shelter, whatever it is that you continuously need to survive.) This book was likely the first of these cleverly titled, yet brief works on some aspect of business funcationality.

The essence of the cheese book is about how we all do (or don’t) deal with change. The author contends, and I would agree, that change is part of everyday life and it’s rather helpful to have some coping tools. I stumbled onto my notes of that read a few weeks ago and thought I’d share some cheese bites:

  1. Remember that old beliefs do not lead you to new cheese. (Complacency = extinction; flexibility = survival)
  2. Don’t over-analyze or over-complicate things. (K.I.S.S.)
  3. Go past fear and enjoy the adventure [journey] of finding new cheese. (The thrill of the hunt…)
  4. Let go of old behavior instead of letting go of the situation or relationship. (Maybe a change of viewpoint would help more than a change of scenery.)
  5. Don’t change, and thus accept the possibility of extinction. (Shift as needed, or be caught without an option)
  6. Consider what you might do if you weren’t afraid. (Is fear holding your ankles and preventing you from moving forward?)
  7. Smell the cheese often so you know when it’s getting old. (Timing is everything.)
  8. Move beyond the fear and feel free. (Caged birds cannot feel the wind.)
  9. Imagine yourself enjoying the new cheese even before you find it. (Visualization can speed up reality.)
  10. Let go of old cheese quicker so you can find new cheese sooner. (When it’s time, it’s time.)
  11. Notice little changes early and help yourself adapt to bigger changes later. (Practice really can make things perfect.)
If you haven’t read the book, do so. It makes a lot of sense and nothing beats good cheese!
Standard